leafy life – better life

Aquaponics growing leafy greens, with chard in...

Aquaponics growing leafy greens, with chard in the forefront. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hydroponics with leafy vegetables.

Hydroponics with leafy vegetables. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A bundle of collard greens, from an o...

English: A bundle of collard greens, from an organic food co-op. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) with vari...

English: Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) with variously colored stems on sale at an outdoor farmers’ market in Rochester, Minnesota (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To encourage you to put more leafy vegetables on your plate, WebMD asked Nussinow to rank the country’s most widely-eaten greens from most nutritious to least. Here’s our top 10 list:
Kale: This nutrition powerhouse “offers everything you want in a leafy green,” says Nussinow, who gave it her first-place ranking. It’s an excellent source of vitamins A C, and K, has a good amount of calcium for a vegetable, and also supplies folate and potassium. Kale’s ruffle-edged leaves may range in color from cream to purple to black depending on the variety.

  1. Before cooking with kale, collards, turnips, and chard, Nussinow recommends swishing the greens in a water-filled sink, draining the sink, then repeating this rinse until the leaves are dirt-free. Her favorite cooking method for these four greens is to rub the leaves in olive oil or tahini (sesame paste) and cook them for five minutes with garlic, olive oil, and broth.

Collards: Used in Southern-style cooking, collard greens are similar in nutrition to kale. But they have a heartier and chewier texture and a stronger cabbage-like taste. “Collards are an under-appreciated vegetable and most people don’t know about them,” suggests Nussinow. She says they’re also popular with the raw food movement because the wide leaves are used as a wrapper instead of tortillas or bread. Down South, collards are typically slow cooked with either a ham hock or smoked turkey leg. A half cup has 25 calories.
Turnip greens: “If you buy turnips with the tops on, you get two vegetables in one,” Nussinow tells WebMD. Turnip leaves are another Southern favorite traditionally made with pork. More tender than other greens and needing less cooking, this sharp-flavored leaf is low in calories yet loaded with vitamins A,C, and K as well as calcium.
Swiss chard: With red stems, stalks, and veins on its leaves, Swiss chard has a beet-like taste and soft texture that’s perfect for sauteeing. Both Swiss chard and spinach contain oxalates, which are slightly reduced by cooking and can bind to calcium, a concern for people prone to kidney stones. Chard contains 15 calories in one-half cup and is a good source of vitamins A and C. Nussinow likes to make a sweet-and-sour chard by adding raisins and vinegar to the cooked greens.
Spinach: Popeye’s favorite vegetable has 20 calories per serving, plus it’s packed with vitamins A and C, as well as folate. And because heat reduces the green’s oxalate content, freeing up its dietary calcium, “cooked spinach gives you more nutrition than raw,” says Nussinow. Spinach leaves can be cooked quickly in the water that remains on them after rinsing, or they can be eaten raw in salads. Bags of frozen chopped spinach are more convenient to use than block kinds, and this mild-flavored vegetable can be added to soups, pasta dishes, and casseroles.
Mustard greens: Another Southern green with a similar nutrition profile to turnip leaves and collards, mustard greens have scalloped edges and come in red and green varieties. They have a peppery taste and give off a mustardy smell during cooking. Their spiciness can be toned down by adding an acid, such as vinegar or lemon juice, toward the end of cooking, suggests Nussinow. Cooked mustard greens have 10 calories in one-half cup.
Broccoli: With 25 calories a serving, broccoli is rich in vitamin C and is also a good source of vitamin A, potassium, and folate. Americans eat about 6 pounds of it a year. Its stalks and florets add both crunch and color to stir-fries. While some kids may call this veggie “trees,” they often like it best raw or steamed with a yogurt-based dip. Nussinow mixes fresh broccoli into her pasta during the last three minutes of cooking so both are ready at the same time.
Red and Green Leaf and Romaine Lettuce: A familiar sight in salad bowls, these lettuces are high in vitamin A and offer some folate. Leaf lettuces have a softer texture than romaine, a crunchy variety used in Caesar salads. Fans of Iceberg lettuce may go for romaine, a crispy green that’s better for you. Nussinow points out “the darker the lettuce leaf, the more nutrition it has,” making red leaf slightly healthier than green. If you don’t drown lettuce in a creamy dressing, one cup contains 10 calories.
Cabbage: Although paler in color than other leafy greens, this cruciferous vegetable is a great source of cancer-fighting compounds and vitamin C. Nussinow considers thisversatile green “the workhorse of the kitchen.” Available in red and green varieties, cabbage can be cooked, added raw to salads or stir fries, shredded into a slaw, or made into sauerkraut. It’s also a staple of St. Patrick’s Day boiled suppers and can give off a strong smell when cooking. One-half cup cooked has 15 calories.
Iceberg Lettuce: This bland-tasting head lettuce is mostly water. But it’s the country’s most popular leafy green and each of us eats about 17 pounds of iceberg a year. While tops in consumption, it’s last on our list for its health benefits. “It’s not devoid of all nutrition, but it’s pretty close,” Nussinow tells WebMD. Although we’re eating less iceberg than we did two decades ago, it’s still a common ingredient on hamburgers and in taco salads. “It can be a starter green,” says Nussinow, to draw people into a broader array of salad greens.
http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthy-kitchen-11/leafy-greens-rated
Incorporating more leafy greens into your daily diet can provide many benefits including health, weight and mental improvements. Adding spinach to salads or making collard greens as a side dish is all it takes to start reaping the rewards of these kinds of foods. Leafy greens cook down so easily that even those who don’t like these veggies can find ways to incorporate them into their regular eating habits. If you still aren’t convinced of the importance of leafy greens, check out these five important benefits you’ll get if you consume them on a regular basis.
Easily Manage Your Weight
Adding more leafy greens into your daily diet can play a dramatic role in your efforts to lose weight or to maintain a healthy weight. They’re so nutrient dense that you can consume a lot of food for just a few calories. In fact, most greens have less than 25 calories per cup which means you can fill up on as much as you like without packing on the calories. Leafy greens are virtually fat free and the little bit of carbohydrates they provide are full of fiber which is also important in aiding weight loss.
Keep Your Heart Healthy
Leafy greens are known for controlling blood pressure and blood sugar levels which in turn lowers the risk of heart disease and heart attacks. Furthermore, the more of these vegetables you eat the less room you have for fattier, less healthy fare and the more satisfied and full you’ll feel throughout the day. Many studies such as the Adventist health study conducted by Loma Linda University show that eating a higher amount of leafy greens results in a lowered risk of cardiovascular disease by more than 11 percent.

Keep Your Body Healthy
Consuming at least two servings of leafy greens on a daily basis will help keep colds, wrinkles and other illness away. This is because green vegetables like spinach, kale, and collards are full of phytonutrients and antioxidants which are known to fight anything from the common cold to cancer. Fresh or cooked, the important part is making sure that these veggies are made a regular part of a healthy diet.
Better Manage and Even Avoid Type 2 Diabetes
Due to the high amount of magnesium and the fact that leafy greens are on the low glycemic index, they’re perfect for those who are dealing with diabetes or trying to avoid it. Incorporating dark leafy green vegetables into your daily diet while limiting sugary, processed foods can make a big difference in your blood sugar levels and help keep potential disease such as diabetes at bay.
Protect Your Eyesight
Dark leafy greens contain a high amount of lutein and zeaxanthin. These are carotenoids that are considered vital nutrients to help prevent degeneration of the eyes. These kinds of veggies even protect against cataracts and can even help the elderly to avoid blindness due to macular degeneration.

http://www.3fatchicks.com/five-health-benefits-of-leafy-greens/

Green juice, green tea and smoothies

Green tea comes from the Far Eastgreen tea accounts for about 20% of the global tea consumption, especially in Asia and several countries in North America. In recent years, green tea has become increasingly popular in the West, for a variety of health benefits associated with it. Has been attributed to green tea are many health benefits, green tea helps in strengthening the immune system, the recovery process after a workout plus green tea raises metabolic rate in the body and thus helps in weight loss. Main advantage of tea is that it is completely natural, contains no added flavorings, colors or preservatives. In addition, tea without added sugar, honey is calorie-free beverage and is a vital element in maintaining the fluid balance in the body.

  • Lettuce juice: Lettuce delicious and nutritious. Dark varieties, such as the Arab lettuce are the most nutritious. Arab lettuce is an excellent source of calcium, chlorophyll, magnesium, iron, potassium, silicon and vitamins A and E. Lettuce especially useful for building Hhmogblin blood. Lettuce juice adds shine, thickness and health of hair and skin. Lettuce provides the hair roots essential nutrients. Silicon containing lettuce keeps muscles and joints flexible. Lettuce juice is beneficial in situations of: anemia, constipation, hair loss, insomnia, liver disorders, nervous disorders and weight reduction.
  • Spinach juice: Drives the gut (good for constipation). Fresh spinach juice no oxalic acid, but only cooked spinach.
  • Another green juice: Parsley juice (1/4 cup) with carrot juice (3/4 cup). Green juices cleanse the lungs. Thus smokers are also excellent. Vegetable juices are also rich in chlorophyll, which is important in the process of cleansing the body. It is used as antiseptic, anti-viral and anti-bacterial, red Maksur builds and enriches the blood iron. Fresh green bean juice plus cabbage sprouts backpack: This combination re-pancreatic cells. Mix with carrots, parsley, celery. Vegetable juices can also add a little green powder (of wheat grass / barley, Chlorella, Spirulina, etc.) or fresh wheat grass juice to complete them into something powerful and healthy. You can also add one or two herbs (parsley, dill, mint, cilantro, etc.), or seaweed Dulles (which is rich in protein, iodine and iron DULSE). Juices – What do we actually have? Vegetable juice as a daily supplement to your diet (2-3 glasses of juice a day). Juice fasting days – which are used in juices daily diet. These days drinking 5-6 glasses of juice a day, in addition for drinking water and herbal tea. Example juice: 1/3 cup carrot juice, 2/3 cup cucumber juice and celery or cucumbers and lettuce.

A vegan office: How one workplace has moved to get healthier together

By Sarah Halzack, Published: May 12 – the washington post

Carrie Clyne’s last job was in an office that feasted on a steady supply of junk food. Donuts in the mornings and cupcakes for staffers’ birthdays were the familiar routine.

But in January, when she took a position with nonprofit organizationPhysicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, she was pleasantly surprised by her new employer’s decidedly different attitude toward food.

PCRM has an office policy mandating that only vegan food may be eaten in its office. The organization, which advocates for healthy eating, preventive medicine and ethical clinical research, is so committed to the rule that it notifies prospective employees of the policy when they receive an offer letter for a job.

PCRM decided to go vegan for a simple reason.

“We want to practice what we preach,” said Susan Levin, the group’s director of nutrition education.

For Clyne, it was a relatively easy transition because she was already a vegan. But she still appreciated how devoted the whole team was to a plant-based diet.

“I feel like we all motivate and encourage each other,” Clyne said.

The staff at the District-based organization help one another enjoy the diet in a variety of ways: They exchange recipes, share their finds for tasty vegan dishes at lunch spots near the office, and take turns making breakfast smoothies for each other in the mornings.

PCRM’s strategy is a different twist on a familiar approach to workplace wellness. In recent years, many employers have been using team challenges or social activities to create incentives for exercising. At PCRM, the built-in community of co-workers is being leveraged to encourage staffers to improve the way they eat.

 

Adapting to a vegan office environment required varied levels of adjustment for PCRM’s 64 employees.

Levin said about one-third of staffers were already eating a fully vegan diet before coming to PCRM. Another third, Levin estimates, were “some of the way there,” perhaps eating a vegetarian diet. For the rest, the diet was likely a big lifestyle change.

The notification employees get when they’re hired is the only direct messaging they receive about the vegan dietary policy.

“There’s no proselytizing,” Levin said.

And if someone chooses not to eat vegan at home, there’s no pressure to change that. (Levin described their approach on this as “Don’t ask, don’t tell.”)

Several employees say they have noticed positive health changes since they began working at PCRM and embracing the group’s approach to eating.

love this vegans

 

English: Food guide pyramid for vegans Deutsch...

English: Food guide pyramid for vegans Deutsch: Ernährungspyramide für Veganer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

http://veganslaughterer.com/2013/05/07/quick-and-easy-strawberry-goji-berry-and-chocolate-chip-naked-vegan-cupcakes/

 

 

 

vegan life choices

an article by Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

vegan “super foods” like soy products and quinoa have been found to contain proteins that break down all the essential amino acids.

“It is absolutely possible to get enough protein from beans, lentils, tofu, soy products and other plant sources like seeds and nuts,” Sheth said. “As long as you’re getting a varied amount throughout the day, your body can mix it up and get what it needs.”

Nutrients that vegans do have to keep careful track of in their diets, according to Sheth and Giancoli, include vitamin B12, a key nutrient in cell metabolism, nerve function and blood production, and calcium, which is needed for healthy bones. Animal products are rich in vitamin B12, and dairy products contain loads of calcium.