leafy life – better life

Aquaponics growing leafy greens, with chard in...

Aquaponics growing leafy greens, with chard in the forefront. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hydroponics with leafy vegetables.

Hydroponics with leafy vegetables. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A bundle of collard greens, from an o...

English: A bundle of collard greens, from an organic food co-op. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) with vari...

English: Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris) with variously colored stems on sale at an outdoor farmers’ market in Rochester, Minnesota (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To encourage you to put more leafy vegetables on your plate, WebMD asked Nussinow to rank the country’s most widely-eaten greens from most nutritious to least. Here’s our top 10 list:
Kale: This nutrition powerhouse “offers everything you want in a leafy green,” says Nussinow, who gave it her first-place ranking. It’s an excellent source of vitamins A C, and K, has a good amount of calcium for a vegetable, and also supplies folate and potassium. Kale’s ruffle-edged leaves may range in color from cream to purple to black depending on the variety.

  1. Before cooking with kale, collards, turnips, and chard, Nussinow recommends swishing the greens in a water-filled sink, draining the sink, then repeating this rinse until the leaves are dirt-free. Her favorite cooking method for these four greens is to rub the leaves in olive oil or tahini (sesame paste) and cook them for five minutes with garlic, olive oil, and broth.

Collards: Used in Southern-style cooking, collard greens are similar in nutrition to kale. But they have a heartier and chewier texture and a stronger cabbage-like taste. “Collards are an under-appreciated vegetable and most people don’t know about them,” suggests Nussinow. She says they’re also popular with the raw food movement because the wide leaves are used as a wrapper instead of tortillas or bread. Down South, collards are typically slow cooked with either a ham hock or smoked turkey leg. A half cup has 25 calories.
Turnip greens: “If you buy turnips with the tops on, you get two vegetables in one,” Nussinow tells WebMD. Turnip leaves are another Southern favorite traditionally made with pork. More tender than other greens and needing less cooking, this sharp-flavored leaf is low in calories yet loaded with vitamins A,C, and K as well as calcium.
Swiss chard: With red stems, stalks, and veins on its leaves, Swiss chard has a beet-like taste and soft texture that’s perfect for sauteeing. Both Swiss chard and spinach contain oxalates, which are slightly reduced by cooking and can bind to calcium, a concern for people prone to kidney stones. Chard contains 15 calories in one-half cup and is a good source of vitamins A and C. Nussinow likes to make a sweet-and-sour chard by adding raisins and vinegar to the cooked greens.
Spinach: Popeye’s favorite vegetable has 20 calories per serving, plus it’s packed with vitamins A and C, as well as folate. And because heat reduces the green’s oxalate content, freeing up its dietary calcium, “cooked spinach gives you more nutrition than raw,” says Nussinow. Spinach leaves can be cooked quickly in the water that remains on them after rinsing, or they can be eaten raw in salads. Bags of frozen chopped spinach are more convenient to use than block kinds, and this mild-flavored vegetable can be added to soups, pasta dishes, and casseroles.
Mustard greens: Another Southern green with a similar nutrition profile to turnip leaves and collards, mustard greens have scalloped edges and come in red and green varieties. They have a peppery taste and give off a mustardy smell during cooking. Their spiciness can be toned down by adding an acid, such as vinegar or lemon juice, toward the end of cooking, suggests Nussinow. Cooked mustard greens have 10 calories in one-half cup.
Broccoli: With 25 calories a serving, broccoli is rich in vitamin C and is also a good source of vitamin A, potassium, and folate. Americans eat about 6 pounds of it a year. Its stalks and florets add both crunch and color to stir-fries. While some kids may call this veggie “trees,” they often like it best raw or steamed with a yogurt-based dip. Nussinow mixes fresh broccoli into her pasta during the last three minutes of cooking so both are ready at the same time.
Red and Green Leaf and Romaine Lettuce: A familiar sight in salad bowls, these lettuces are high in vitamin A and offer some folate. Leaf lettuces have a softer texture than romaine, a crunchy variety used in Caesar salads. Fans of Iceberg lettuce may go for romaine, a crispy green that’s better for you. Nussinow points out “the darker the lettuce leaf, the more nutrition it has,” making red leaf slightly healthier than green. If you don’t drown lettuce in a creamy dressing, one cup contains 10 calories.
Cabbage: Although paler in color than other leafy greens, this cruciferous vegetable is a great source of cancer-fighting compounds and vitamin C. Nussinow considers thisversatile green “the workhorse of the kitchen.” Available in red and green varieties, cabbage can be cooked, added raw to salads or stir fries, shredded into a slaw, or made into sauerkraut. It’s also a staple of St. Patrick’s Day boiled suppers and can give off a strong smell when cooking. One-half cup cooked has 15 calories.
Iceberg Lettuce: This bland-tasting head lettuce is mostly water. But it’s the country’s most popular leafy green and each of us eats about 17 pounds of iceberg a year. While tops in consumption, it’s last on our list for its health benefits. “It’s not devoid of all nutrition, but it’s pretty close,” Nussinow tells WebMD. Although we’re eating less iceberg than we did two decades ago, it’s still a common ingredient on hamburgers and in taco salads. “It can be a starter green,” says Nussinow, to draw people into a broader array of salad greens.
http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthy-kitchen-11/leafy-greens-rated
Incorporating more leafy greens into your daily diet can provide many benefits including health, weight and mental improvements. Adding spinach to salads or making collard greens as a side dish is all it takes to start reaping the rewards of these kinds of foods. Leafy greens cook down so easily that even those who don’t like these veggies can find ways to incorporate them into their regular eating habits. If you still aren’t convinced of the importance of leafy greens, check out these five important benefits you’ll get if you consume them on a regular basis.
Easily Manage Your Weight
Adding more leafy greens into your daily diet can play a dramatic role in your efforts to lose weight or to maintain a healthy weight. They’re so nutrient dense that you can consume a lot of food for just a few calories. In fact, most greens have less than 25 calories per cup which means you can fill up on as much as you like without packing on the calories. Leafy greens are virtually fat free and the little bit of carbohydrates they provide are full of fiber which is also important in aiding weight loss.
Keep Your Heart Healthy
Leafy greens are known for controlling blood pressure and blood sugar levels which in turn lowers the risk of heart disease and heart attacks. Furthermore, the more of these vegetables you eat the less room you have for fattier, less healthy fare and the more satisfied and full you’ll feel throughout the day. Many studies such as the Adventist health study conducted by Loma Linda University show that eating a higher amount of leafy greens results in a lowered risk of cardiovascular disease by more than 11 percent.

Keep Your Body Healthy
Consuming at least two servings of leafy greens on a daily basis will help keep colds, wrinkles and other illness away. This is because green vegetables like spinach, kale, and collards are full of phytonutrients and antioxidants which are known to fight anything from the common cold to cancer. Fresh or cooked, the important part is making sure that these veggies are made a regular part of a healthy diet.
Better Manage and Even Avoid Type 2 Diabetes
Due to the high amount of magnesium and the fact that leafy greens are on the low glycemic index, they’re perfect for those who are dealing with diabetes or trying to avoid it. Incorporating dark leafy green vegetables into your daily diet while limiting sugary, processed foods can make a big difference in your blood sugar levels and help keep potential disease such as diabetes at bay.
Protect Your Eyesight
Dark leafy greens contain a high amount of lutein and zeaxanthin. These are carotenoids that are considered vital nutrients to help prevent degeneration of the eyes. These kinds of veggies even protect against cataracts and can even help the elderly to avoid blindness due to macular degeneration.

http://www.3fatchicks.com/five-health-benefits-of-leafy-greens/

9 things about sweet potatoes you just ought to know!

English: Picture of fries made from sweet pota...

English: Picture of fries made from sweet potatoes. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The softer, orange-fleshed variety of sweet po...

The softer, orange-fleshed variety of sweet potato, commonly referred to as a yam in the United States (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Experimental line of provitamin A-enriched ora...

Experimental line of provitamin A-enriched orange maize, harvested in Zambia (Photo credit: CIMMYT)

1.  They are high in vitamin B6.  Vitamin B6 helps reduce the chemical homocysteine in our bodies.  Homocysteine has been linked with degenerative diseases, including the prevention of heart attacks.
2. They are a good source of vitamin C.  While most people know that vitamin C is important to help ward off cold and flu viruses, few people are aware that this crucial vitamin plays an important role in bone and tooth formation, digestion, and blood cell formation. It helps accelerate wound healing, produces collagen which helps maintain skin’s youthful elasticity, and is essen­tial to helping us cope with stress. It even appears to help protect our body against toxins that may be linked to cancer.
3.  They contain Vitamin D which is critical for immune system and overall health at this time of year.  Both a vitamin and a hormone, vitamin D is primarily made in our bodies as a result of getting adequate sunlight. You may have heard about seasonal affective disorder (or SAD, as it is also called), which is linked to inadequate sunlight and therefore a vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin Dplays an important role in our energy levels, moods, and helps to build healthy bones, heart, nerves, skin, and teeth, and it supports the thyroid gland.
4.  Sweet potatoes contain iron. Most people are aware that we need the mineral iron to have adequate energy, but iron plays other important roles in our body, including red and white blood cell production, resistance to stress, proper im­mune functioning, and the metabolizing of protein, among other things.
5.  Sweet potatoes are a good source of mag­nesium, which is the relaxation and anti-stress mineral. Magnesium is necessary for healthy artery, blood, bone, heart, muscle, and nerve function, yet experts estimate that approximately 80 percent of the popula­tion in North America may be deficient in this important mineral.
Superior fiber content
Sweet potatoes contain almost twice as much fiber as other types of potatoes. Contributing close to 7 grams of fiber per serving, they make an excellent starchy addition to any meal. The high fiber content gives them a “slow burning” quality. This basically means their caloric energy is used more slowly and efficiently than a low-fiber carbohydrate.

6. Heart-healthy
They contain a large amount of vitamin B6. This vitamin is crucial in breaking down a substance called homocysteine, which contributes to hardening of the arteries and blood vessels. Vitamin B6 helps keep the walls of these important blood passageways flexible and healthy which allows blood to flow freely.

In addition, sweet potatoes contain high amounts of potassium. Potassium plays an important role in lowering blood pressure by ridding the body of excess sodium and regulating fluid balance. It is also an important electrolyte that helps regulate the natural rhythm of the heart, and maintains normal function of the brain and central nervous system.

7. Rich in beta-carotene
Beta-carotene or vitamin A is an important antioxidant. One medium sweet potato provides your body with the complete recommended daily allowance of vitamin A and then some. Vitamin A is useful in the prevention of several different types of cancer as it is one of the most potent antioxidants out there.

Beta-carotene also helps to internally protect your skin from sun damage by both deflecting and repairing cell damage caused by excessive UV exposure. It also is an excellent nutrient for eye health and has been linked to prevention of vision loss and macular degeneration.

8. A great source of manganese
Manganese is a little-discussed trace mineral that has some great health benefits. It is a pivotal component in the metabolism of carbohydrates which helps support healthy blood sugar levels. This can help stabilize the appetite for hours as opposed to the temporary satisfaction that comes with most other carbohydrates.

It also is a cofactor in enzymes that play an important role in the generation of energy as well as the efficient utilization of antioxidants. It is used for the treatment of anemia and is useful as a treatment for several premenstrual symptoms in women as well.

9. Rich in vitamins C and E
As if being one of the top vegetable sources of beta-carotene weren’t enough, sweet potatoes are also rich in vitamins C and E. These are potent antioxidant vitamins that play an important role in disease prevention and longevity.

Both vitamins also play a huge role in the health and beauty of your skin and hair, making them popular supplements. The combination of beta-carotene, vitamin E and vitamin C in one food makes the sweet potato one heck of a “beauty food”. These nutrients all contribute to a healthy, glowing complexion and vibrant hair.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/035739_sweet_potatoes_beta-carotene_nutrients.html#ixzz2aiYD4jG0

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/9-reasons-to-love-sweet-potatoes.html#ixzz2aiXuCJP5

What is vegan? why vegan?

Raw vegan lunch. Spicy seaweed wraps with pean...

Raw vegan lunch. Spicy seaweed wraps with peanut sauce (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dairy products and their production

Dairy products and their production (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, or poultry. Vegans, in addition to being vegetarian, do not use other animal products and by-products such as eggs, dairy products, honey, leather, fur, silk, wool, cosmetics, and soaps derived from animal products.

Why Veganism?

People choose to be vegan for health, environmental, and/or ethical reasons. For example, some vegans feel that one promotes the meat industry by consuming eggs and dairy products. That is, once dairy cows or egg-laying chickens are too old to be productive, they are often sold as meat; and since male calves do not produce milk, they usually are raised for veal or other products. Some people avoid these items because of conditions associated with their production.

Many vegans choose this lifestyle to promote a more humane and caring world. They know they are not perfect, but believe they have a responsibility to try to do their best, while not being judgmental of others.

Vegan Nutrition

The key to a nutritionally sound vegan diet is variety. A healthy and varied vegan diet includes fruits, vegetables, plenty of leafy greens, whole grain products, nuts, seeds, and legumes.

Healthy eating

You should be able to get most of the nutrients you need from eating a varied and balanced vegan diet.

A healthy vegan diet contains:

  • plenty of fruit and vegetables
  • plenty of starchy foods
  • some non-dairy sources of protein such as beans and pulses
  • some dairy alternatives such as fortified soya drink
  • just a small amount of fatty and sugary foods

Some things you ought to know… Carrots and Broccoli

Carrot (CARROT)

Latin: DAUCUS CAROTA

Apiaceae family
(UMBELLIFERAE Family)

Carrots – Health King! Studies show time and again the power to effectively fight disease. More than 200 human studies, carrots and repeated consistently appeared as one of the most important foods Cancer, along with greens, tomatoes and cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower). The Power Sector, also helps protect against other diseases, prevention of yellow pigments Orchestra – orange family Carotenoids: Alpha – carotene, beta – and of course Kriftoksntin beta – carotene, carotenoid common and suspect them.

The orange team

Carotenoids such as beta – carotene and alpha – typical carrot carotene, plus other phytochemicals, are also different concentrations in vegetables and other fruits.

Get the “orange team”:

Carrots
Sweet potato
Pumpkin
Squash
Orange Hotel

Who are you beta – carotene?

Beta – Carotene:

Pigment Yellow – Orange family of carotenoids.

The Carotenoids

Carotenoids are a large family of pigments responsible for the yellow color, orange and red vegetables and many fruits. Today recognized 600 carotenoids contributing to reduced risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and blindness. Carotenoids may also slow down the aging process, reduce complications associated with diabetes, and improve lung function.

Beta – carotene is known between carotenoids and is also used as the main source of vitamin A (and therefore is called pro – vitamin A). Vitamin A is essential for vision, maintaining the proper functioning of the immune system, normal growth, maintenance of healthy skin and reduce cancer risk. Else, 50 other carotenoids are also a source of vitamin, although beta – carotene is common among them.

Beta – Carotene – long arms Cancer Fighter

Beta – Carotene cellular communications

Beta – carotene helps the type of cellular communications that can help prevent cancer. Abnormal communication between cells may be one reason overgrowth of cells, a condition that leads ultimately to cancer. Beta – Carotene Helps intercellular communication by activation of a gene, which created tiny openings in the cell and allows the transfer of information from cell to cell. Studies it appears that all the dietary carotenoids, including lycopene main, lutein and beta – Kriftoksntin, helping cellular communication, but beta – carotene does it better than the others.

Broccoli

Broccoli sprouts health food are first class.

Broccoli is a vegetable from the cabbage, cruciferous. For many years it is recognized as a health food. Tend to eat it steamed. But, if you want to keep most of the health qualities, it is important to eat him alive, or make him juice with carrots and other vegetables. Eaten broccoli sprouts contribute to health living.
 
Broccoli prevents diseases

Broccoli Juice health drink is considered first class. It contains a substance called Glokorofnin Lolforofo making material, a powerful anti-cancer. It has Teotziantim active substances in anti-cancer genes. Eating sprouts helps prevent and cure several types of cancer, especially prostate cancer.

It also helps to clean toxins from the liver. Broccoli juice has a high level of selenium and fiber – so this juice helps prevent cancer of the stomach and colon.

The juice provides protection from UV damage, and that the protection of the interior cells. At the same time, he does not bother to create vitamin D during exposure to the sun – use sun protection creams also interfere to create vitamin D.

Broccoli also has antioxidant capabilities, it reduces hypertension – blood and reduces risk of dangerous infections of the heart muscle and arteries.

Sulforaphane found in broccoli

Sulforaphane found in broccoli helps against Helicobacter pylori, a bacteria cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer. The remaining fibers contribute to the proliferation broccoli juice acidophilus bacteria in the intestines. It also lowers cholesterol levels.

Calcium which helps maintain bone mass and body fat burning. It reduces the production of cortisol, a stress hormone that increases excessive appetite and fat accumulation in the abdomen.

Broccoli also contains significant amounts of folic acid, it is always important but especially for pregnant women, it has a nice amount of vitamin C as an antioxidant and inflammation and it also helps the absorption of iron from food plants. When you combine broccoli juice with juices of other foods, such a combination has further increased ability to maintain health. Can be combined with celery juice, cucumber, cabbage leaves, a little ginger root, as well as carrot juice or apple that enhance the flavor of the juice involved.

Broccoli also protects against stomach ulcers and duodenal and gastric cancer. Daily consumption of broccoli sprouts or its flowers may greatly reduce the risk of gastric ulcers and duodenal or gastric cancer. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the United States conducted a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research professional. In this study gave 30 men in Japan for two months to eat or about 70 C day broccoli sprouts or such amount of alfalfa sprouts. With the beginning of the experiment and participants were ultimately tests to detect fecal contamination with H. pylori causes chronic inflammation of the stomach, gastric ulcers and duodenal ulcers to gastric cancer.

The researchers found that those who ate broccoli sprouts, bug infestation level decreased by 40% with the end of the experiment. Who stopped eating these sprouts within two months of the initial infestation is back to its level. Alfalfa sprouts had no effect on the bug infestation.